Category CSE Magazine
Title Expectations
Author/s Ron Whipple
Preview The Brown family just relocated to your locality. They have a beautiful little girl named Beth, who is going into grade 7. Mrs. Brown calls the admissions director of your school—Somewhere Christian School—to ask for more information, having the intention of possibly enrolling her daughter in the school.
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The Brown family just relocated to your locality. They have a beautiful little girl named Beth, who is going into grade 7. Mrs. Brown calls the admissions director of your school-Somewhere Christian School-to ask for more information, having the intention of possibly enrolling her daughter in the school. The admissions director schedules an appointment for Mrs. Brown to come and visit. As Mrs. Brown prepares for the visit, she thinks about her expectations for a school for her daughter. Beth is reserved about this change in her life, but she hopes that a number of her desires will be fulfilled. As the admissions director does for each appointment with a new family, she asks the Lord for the ability to communicate clearly and asks the Lord to give her a sensitivity about whether this family would meet the expectations that Somewhere Christian School has for each student and family who enroll there. And what about Beth? What is going through her mind and heart as she thinks about this new experience?

Sound familiar? The following charts will help you rate your school in three categories of expectations. In this time of increased accountability, we have the obligation to recognize these expectations and respond adequately with godly wisdom. Use these charts as an opportunity to assess your school.

Mark each expectation on a scale of 1 to 5 for your school:

1 The school, not even having considered that expectation, is not prepared to handle it.

5 The school-with respect and honesty-has carefully reviewed that expectation. The school has given consideration to each constituent group. The school clearly understands its specific purpose and evaluates that expectation in relation to the school's mission.

A. How well does the school handle the expectations that Mr. and Mrs. Brown have?

[See download for response table.]

B. How clearly does the school communicate to Mr. and Mrs. Brown its expectations of itself and of parents?

[See download for response table.]

C. Beth Brown is also coming to school with expectations of her own. Facing a new experience can be frightening. How ready is Somewhere Christian School to meet some of her expectations?

[See download for response table.]

How did your school rate? Why not take some time with your faculty and staff to examine these expectations in order to determine what the school needs to do to raise the level of accountability. The lists above are not exhaustive by any means. This exercise will assist you to face these issues honestly and creatively.

The Bible is clear about the special love and care that God has for each child He creates. In His sovereignty, God brings students and their families to our schools. God holds us accountable to fulfill His purposes in the lives of each student. Scripture makes it clear that the primary responsibility rests with the parents. As our culture changes, the roles and responsibilities of the home, the church, and the school have a much greater impact on students. Christian schools must be honest about their limitations but committed to the awesome responsibility of being God's instrument in the life of each of their students.


Ron Whipple, MA, has served in Christian education for 50 years. Currently an education consultant, he has worked as a teacher, a coach, a department head, an assistant headmaster, and a headmaster. His experience includes accreditation work for ACSI, CSI, CSF, MSA, and AdvancED, having served on more than 30 site teams.

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